Buttigieg wins endorsement from VoteVets group

VoteVets, the nation’s largest political action committee that supports liberal veterans for public office, announced its presidential endorsement for South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE Wednesday.

The endorsement, the first in the progressive group’s history, could serve as another boost for Buttigieg, a former Navy officer who served in Afghanistan. The announcement comes as polling shows a fluid race in early voting states with the Indiana Democrat at or near the top in Iowa and New Hampshire.

“The number one priority has to be beating Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE. In the 13 years VoteVets has been in existence, we have come to see one thing repeated time after time: Veterans can win voters in the purple and red areas of the country that other Democrats cannot,” said Jon Soltz, an  Iraq War veteran and chairman of VoteVets, referring to several veterans who won tight races in the 2018 midterms. 

ADVERTISEMENT

“We need a candidate who will win. Bar none, Pete gives us the best shot at doing just that. It is time to rally around him, and stop the walking, talking national security threat that is Donald Trump.”

Along with the endorsement, VoteVets said it would cut a maximum donation check of $2,700 to Buttigieg’s campaign and would use its social media networks and email list to support him. It also teased that “further plans to energize veterans and military families across the country” will be announced as the campaign moves forward. 

The group could also activate support from its super PAC, which can engage in issue advocacy and is not mandated to reveal its donors.

“In uniform, I learned that when Americans from different backgrounds are brought together for a common purpose, we form the strongest fighting force in the world,” said Buttigieg. “I’m honored to have this endorsement from my fellow veterans as we seek to take on our nation’s most urgent challenges and pick up the pieces and put the country back together after Trump.”

Click Here: Golf special

Buttigieg has sought to flex his muscle among those connected to the military, announcing earlier this month endorsements from over 4,300 veterans and military community members from all 50 states and Puerto Rico. He also unveiled a sweeping plan this month to help veterans, including increasing support to reintegrate them after they complete their service and assisting service members’ families. 

ADVERTISEMENT

However, Wednesday’s endorsement from VoteVets marks the first time Buttigieg’s campaign has won the support of a major political organization as a slimming — but still crowded — 2020 field competes for high-profile backers.

The announcement could be interpreted as a snub of Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (D-Hawaii), another veteran running in the 2020 race who received the support of VoteVets in her House bids. 

It could also come with some baggage for Buttigieg, as an increasingly activist base has urged presidential candidates to shun support from super PACs to avoid competing loyalties with special interest groups. While most of the 2020 Democrats said they did not want such groups to influence the primary race, none have explicitly rejected money that super PACs have spent to support their campaign.

Sessions leads GOP Senate primary field in Alabama, internal poll shows

Former U.S. Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsMcCabe, Rosenstein spar over Russia probe Rosenstein takes fire from Republicans in heated testimony Rosenstein defends Mueller appointment, role on surveillance warrants MORE holds a wide lead in the race for the Republican Senate nomination in Alabama, according to an internal poll commissioned by Sessions’ campaign. 

The survey, conducted from Dec. 3-5 by the Republican firm On Message Inc., shows Sessions notching 44 percent support among likely Republican primary voters in Alabama. 

Click Here: cheap INTERNATIONAL jersey

No other candidate is within striking distance. Tommy Tuberville, the former head football coach at Auburn University, came in a distant second place with 21 percent support, while Rep. Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneOvernight Defense: Pentagon chief says he opposes invoking Insurrection Act for protests | White House dodges on Trump’s confidence in Esper | ‘Angry and appalled’ Mattis scorches Trump Republicans stand by Esper after public break with Trump Democrats press OSHA official on issuing an Emergency Temporary Standard MORE (R-Ala.) finished third with 14 percent support. No other candidate registered in double digits, according to the poll. 

ADVERTISEMENT

The poll was first reported on Tuesday by the Alabama news website Yellowhammer News. 

Sessions, who held the Senate seat for 20 years before becoming President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE’s attorney general in 2017, launched a bid to recapture the seat last month and quickly emerged among the frontrunners for the Republican nomination to challenge Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) in the 2020 general election.

Jones, who won a long-shot special election to fill Sessions’s seat in 2017, is widely seen as one of the most vulnerable incumbent senators up for reelection in 2020. Alabama is among the most conservative states in the country, and Republicans see Jones’s victory there two years ago as a fluke – more the result of a flawed GOP contender than a winning Democratic message.

The Cook Political Report, a nonpartisan election handicapper, currently rates the Alabama Senate race as a “toss up.”

The internal poll from Sessions’ campaign shows the former attorney general with the highest favorability of any Republican in the race – 71 percent, compared to 50 percent for Tuberville and 37 percent or Byrne. In a memo, pollster Wes Anderson said that Sessions’ favorability isn’t limited to any one region of Alabama. “Rather Sessions is strong in every corner of the state,” Anderson wrote.

The poll surveyed 700 likely Republican primary voters by telephone from Dec. 3-5. It has a margin of error of +/-3.7 percentage points.

O'Rourke says he'll focus on flipping Texas state House in 2020

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke (D-Texas) said Tuesday that he plans to focus on flipping the Texas state House to Democratic control in 2020.

“Everything flows up from that,” the former presidential candidate told reporters, according to The Texas Tribune. “So not only could Democrats gain control of the House and make progress on stormwater infrastructure, health care, gun violence, climate and education, but that will incidentally help the federal races — from U.S. Congress to U.S. Senate — and I also think it’s also going to lay the groundwork for whoever the presidential nominee is.”

O’Rourke told reporters of his new plans while campaigning with Eliz Markowitz, who is running for a state House seat and preparing for a run-off election next month, according to the Tribune. He said it was the first time he has returned to the campaign trail following his withdrawal from the presidential race in early November.  

ADVERTISEMENT

The former presidential candidate said during his 2018 Senate campaign that he worked with state House candidates and they “produced historic turnout,” according to the Tribune.

O’Rourke has made several endorsements for Texas candidates, including state House candidate Lorraine Birabil over James Armstrong and former campaign adviser Sima Ladjevardian over U.S. Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawGOP lawmakers call for new sanctions on senior Chinese officials Michigan suspends license of barber who vowed to keep his shop open ‘until Jesus comes’ The Hill’s Coronavirus Report: Rep. Hurd says China engaged in global disinformation campaign; US unemployment highest since Great Depression MORE (R-Texas). He added that he will support the Democratic nominees in these races once they are chosen, the Tribune reported.

But O’Rourke is avoiding the 2020 Senate election, saying he will not get involved until the Democratic nominee is picked.

Markowitz will face Republican Gary Gates on Jan. 28 after earning 39 percent of the vote in the November election. Gates had 28 percent support, but Republican candidates overall took home 61 percent of the vote, according to the Texas newspaper.

O’Rourke and Markowitz attended an anti-gun violence roundtable with the Greater Houston chapter of Moms Demand Action after speaking with reporters.

The former lawmaker dropped out of the presidential race after his poll numbers plateaued. O’Rourke lost to Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote The Hill’s Morning Report – Trump’s public standing sags after Floyd protests GOP senators introduce resolution opposing calls to defund the police MORE (R-Texas) in the 2018 Senate election. 

Click Here: Bape Kid 1st Camo Ape Head rompers

Trump campaign steps up attacks on Sanders

The Trump campaign is stepping up its attacks on Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE, a reflection of the Independent Vermont senator’s momentum in the race for the Democratic nomination and his sharp criticism of a U.S. military strike against an Iran official that has provoked turmoil in the Middle East.

For most of 2019, President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE’s allies braced for an eventual clash with former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Trump finalizing executive order calling on police to use ‘force with compassion’ The Hill’s Campaign Report: Biden campaign goes on offensive against Facebook MORE, who remains a top contender for the Democratic nomination.

But Trump’s attacks this week underscore how the president’s campaign increasingly views Sanders as a potential general election threat.

ADVERTISEMENT

“You know you’re doing well when you get attacked in politics, and the biggest concern in politics is if you don’t get any attacks because then you’re irrelevant,” said Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaProgressive Caucus co-chair endorses Kennedy in Massachusetts Senate primary Biden’s right, we need policing reform now – the House should quickly take up his call to action The Hill’s Coronavirus Report: Association of American Railroads Ian Jefferies says no place for hate, racism or bigotry in rail industry or society; Trump declares victory in response to promising jobs report MORE (D-Calif.), a top adviser to the Sanders campaign.

“I’ve heard reports in private from people that Trump doesn’t actually underestimate him. He understands Sanders’s appeal to rural America. He understands Sanders’s appeal to working-class voters,” Khanna added.

At a campaign rally in Toledo, Ohio, on Thursday night, Trump singled out Sanders for criticizing the strike that resulted in the death of Gen. Qassem Soleimani. A separate Trump campaign statement warned that Sanders “can’t be trusted to defend American lives” as commander in chief.

Both Trump and Sanders have campaigned on the promise to end U.S. involvement in military conflicts in the Middle East, but escalating tensions in Iran have complicated the president’s message on that front.

Earlier in the week, the Trump campaign attacked Sanders as a “wealthy, fossil fuel-guzzling millionaire” who “lectures Americans on how to live their lives while doing the exact opposite.”

Click Here: Fjallraven Kanken Art Spring Landscape Backpacks

That statement also described Sanders as the “Democrats’ leading candidate for president,” highlighting the Vermont senator’s improved position in a tight race for the nomination.

ADVERTISEMENT

Among some Trump allies, there is a level of respect for Sanders, whom they view as having built an outsider movement in the same vein as Trump despite receiving unfair treatment from the media and the national party.

There is some overlap on policies between Trump and Sanders, particularly on trade and the insistence that the U.S. avoid costly foreign entanglements.

And some Trump allies have debated whether Sanders would have won Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania and defeated Trump in 2016 if Democrats had nominated him instead of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhite House accuses Biden of pushing ‘conspiracy theories’ with Trump election claim Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness Trayvon Martin’s mother Sybrina Fulton qualifies to run for county commissioner in Florida MORE.

Trump’s allies think Sanders could be a formidable candidate in 2020, particularly among the white working-class voters Democrats have struggled to reach.

“If Bernie wins the nomination, it does weird things to the electoral landscape,” said one Republican with close ties to the campaign. “It shakes up the map, and we have no idea how it shakes up the map.”

Still, the Trump campaign believes it can effectively render Sanders unelectable nationally by casting him as a far-left socialist.

And Trump World insiders are confident they’ll uncover a treasure trove of problematic audio and video clips documenting Sanders’s decades-long political career if he becomes the nominee.

“Imagine the crazy stuff he was saying in local radio interviews when he was mayor in Burlington, Vt., or a congressman in late ’80s and early ’90s and got zero media coverage,” the Trump ally said. “So far, Republicans have just played softball with Bernie and used him as a cudgel to attack other Democrats. We don’t know how Bernie will act or how it could affect him if he had the right-wing kill machine aimed at him.”

At the moment, Trump and Sanders are going toe-to-toe over Iran, as the Vermont senator has sought to cast himself as the most stridently anti-war Democrat in the race and a leading critic of the administration’s decision to take out the Iranian general.  

The debate is particularly salient because both Trump and Sanders have fashioned themselves as skeptics of military interventionism. Trump has hammered the GOP establishment over the U.S.-led war in Iraq, and Sanders has pummeled Biden over his vote to authorize that military action.

Sanders and Khanna released new legislation this week to limit Trump’s options on Iran while blasting the lawmakers who voted to authorize a $738 billion military budget that “places no restrictions on the president from starting an unauthorized war with Iran.”

“We know that it will ultimately be the children of working-class families who will have to fight and die in a new Middle East conflict, not the children of the billionaire class,” Sanders and Khanna said in a joint statement. “At a time when we face the urgent need to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure, to build the housing we desperately need, and to address the existential crisis of climate change, we as a nation, must get our priorities right.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump appears to have backed away from the brink of war with Iran and insists he has no intention of embarking on a new war in the Middle East.

The administration has argued that Soleimani was planning new attacks on U.S. facilities and personnel in Iraq. Trump’s defenders have characterized the strike as a show of strength against a figure who has masterminded attacks that have resulted in the deaths of scores of Americans in Iraq.

Trump is blasting back at Sanders and others who have said that the president should have gone to Congress before striking.

“We have Bernie and [Speaker] Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Pelosi: Georgia primary ‘disgrace’ could preview an election debacle in November MORE [D-Calif.]. We have them all. They’re all trying to say, ‘How dare you take him out that way? You should get permission from Congress,’” Trump said at Thursday’s rally. “We had to make a decision.”

The Trump campaign has also sought to highlight various interviews Sanders has given on the matter to cast him as extreme.

Sanders has described Soleimani’s killing as an “assassination” and likened it to the Russian government murdering political “dissidents.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Sanders is basking in the attention, which pits him directly against the president amid a crowded field of Democratic White House hopefuls with the Iowa caucuses only weeks away.

In a Friday statement, Sanders blasted reports that Trump had moved to kill Soleimani because he believed it would improve his standing among the GOP senators who will act as jurors in an impeachment trial this month.

“Once again, we see Trump making enormously consequential national security decisions based on his own personal political needs,” Sanders said. “As a U.S. senator, I will do everything I can to rein in this reckless president and prevent a war with Iran. I call on my colleagues to do the same.”

Julia Manchester contributed.

DNC raises thresholds for January debate

The Democratic National Committee (DNC) raised the qualification requirements for the January primary debate, despite calls from candidates to lower standards.

To qualify for the Jan. 14 debate, candidates need at least 5 percent support in at least four approved polls that can be either national or based in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and/or Nevada. Polls must be sponsored by different entities or be based on different geographical areas if conducted by the same organization and will need to be released between Nov. 14 of this year and Jan. 10, 2020.

Candidates can also meet the polling requirement by receiving at least 7 percent support in two single-state polls in the first four primary or caucus states. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Candidates will also need 225,000 unique donors and at least 1,000 unique donors per state in at least 20 U.S. states, territories, or Washington, D.C. 

The criteria has been toughened despite calls from 2020 candidates led by Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRand Paul introduces bill to end no-knock warrants Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-N.J.) to lower standards to allow a more diverse slate of candidates to make the debate stage.

The debate held on Thursday night featured almost exclusively white candidates, with businessman Andrew YangAndrew YangGeorge Floyd protests show corporations must support racial and economic equality Andrew Yang discusses his universal basic income pilot program Andrew Yang on the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis MORE the only person of color among the seven participants. It was the smallest gathering out of the six Democratic primary debates so far.

To make Thursday’s debate in Los Angeles, candidates needed to hit at least 4 percent support in four approved polls or 6 percent support in two early-state polls and needed at least 200,000 donors.

Among the candidates who failed to make the stage in California were Booker as well as former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (D-Hawaii).

The January event will be held in Des Moines, Iowa, and will be hosted by the DNC, CNN and the Des Moines Register.

It will be held just days before the Feb. 3 Iowa caucus that will mark the first time ballots are cast in the Democratic primary race.

Click Here: cd universidad catolica

'Queer Eye' star Jonathan Van Ness to campaign with Warren in Iowa

“Queer Eye” star Jonathan Van Ness said Thursday he will join Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) on the presidential campaign trail this month in Iowa, just weeks ahead of the state’s Feb. 3 caucuses.

“I don’t know about you, but I’m ready to do everything I can to help her win,” Van Ness wrote in an email to Warren supporters. “That’s why I’m joining Elizabeth to campaign for big, structural change in Iowa this month.”

The email did not offer details about Van Ness’s upcoming campaign appearances. The Hill has reached out to Warren’s campaign for comment. 

ADVERTISEMENT

An Iowa State University–Civiqs poll released last month shows Warren at 18 percent, trailing former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach Biden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It’s as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.).

Van Ness endorsed Warren in September, citing the cost of his HIV medication.

“The moment I knew I was endorsing Elizabeth Warren was last month when I misplaced my HIV meds,” Van Ness tweeted at the time. “It cost $3500 to replace them out of pocket with ‘amazing’ plantinum [sic] level insurance. Healthcare shouldn’t be for-profit ever, it’s a human right.”

The Netflix star has been very public about his involvement in politics over the past year. In September, he met with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Pelosi: Georgia primary ‘disgrace’ could preview an election debacle in November MORE (D-Calif.) to discuss the Equality Act, which would codify civil rights protections for LGBT people.

Earlier in 2019, Van Ness and some of his fellow “Queer Eye” cast members met with Pelosi and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezAttorney says 75-year-old man shoved by Buffalo police suffered brain injury How language is bringing down Donald Trump Highest-circulation Kentucky newspaper endorses Charles Booker in Senate race MORE (D-N.Y.).

Van Ness is the latest high-profile celebrity to lend their support to Warren. U.S. soccer star Megan Rapinoe last month announced in an Instagram post that she was backing Warren.

Click Here: Putters

Ocasio-Cortez defends decision not to pay dues to House Democratic campaign arm

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezAttorney says 75-year-old man shoved by Buffalo police suffered brain injury How language is bringing down Donald Trump Highest-circulation Kentucky newspaper endorses Charles Booker in Senate race MORE (D-N.Y.) on Friday defended her decision not to pay dues to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC), saying she would instead seek to funnel money directly to Democrats in tough races.

Asked by The Hill if she intended to pay dues to the House Democratic campaign arm this cycle, Ocasio-Cortez replied, “I don’t think so.”

Ocasio-Cortez, whose unexpected win in a 2018 primary against longtime incumbent Rep. Joseph Crowley (D-N.Y.) propelled her to political stardom in progressive circles, has emerged as one of the Democratic Party’s most prolific fundraisers in the House.

ADVERTISEMENT

In the third quarter of 2019, she raised more money than any other House Democrat, including Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names Black lawmakers unveil bill to remove Confederate statues from Capitol Pelosi: Georgia primary ‘disgrace’ could preview an election debacle in November MORE (D-Calif.). Her most recent federal filing shows that she raked in more than $1.4 million between July 1 and Sept. 30.

Ocasio-Cortez has spoken critically of the DCCC in the past, particularly after it began sidelining vendors who work with candidates seeking to challenge incumbent Democrats in primaries.

She said that instead of paying the DCCC dues — about $250,000 for the 2019-2020 election cycle — she would seek to give directly to Democratic candidates.

“We are trying to raise the equivalent of my dues directly to other members,” Ocasio-Cortez told The Hill. She said the money she has raised has so far gone to backing House Democrats, as well as nonincumbent candidates.

A spokesperson for the DCCC did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Click Here: cheap INTERNATIONAL jersey

Fox News reported Friday that Ocasio-Cortez’s plan to withhold dues had rankled some congressional Democrats who worried the move could hurt the party’s efforts to keep control of the House.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Sometimes the question comes: ‘Do you want to be in a majority or do you want to be in the minority?’ ” Rep. Gregory MeeksGregory Weldon MeeksHighest-circulation Kentucky newspaper endorses Charles Booker in Senate race To move the recovery forward, invest in transportation infrastructure Sanders endorses Engel challenger in New York primary MORE (D-N.Y.) told Fox News. “And do you want to be part of a team?”

Rep. Henry Cuellar (D-Texas), who is facing a primary challenge from a progressive Democrat backed by Ocasio-Cortez, expressed frustration over what he described as efforts to “purify” the Democratic Caucus by ousting members who aren’t part of the party’s progressive wing.

“To have people try to purify the caucus because they don’t agree with them — 100 percent, I certainly don’t agree with that,” he told Fox News. “Hopefully, we will start to get away from this circular firing squad.”

Despite Ocasio-Cortez’s decision to not pay dues, the DCCC isn’t hurting for money. Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosGOP pulls support from California House candidate over ‘unacceptable’ social media posts Republican flips House seat in California special election GOP’s Don Bacon and challenger neck and neck in Democratic poll MORE (D-Ill.), chairwoman of the DCCC, announced Thursday that the group had raised $14.4 million in December, its best fundraising month in 2019.

Ocasio-Cortez told Fox News that she still backed some of her colleagues in their reelection bids, but noted that she was also willing to break with certain members of her party.

“I’m happy to support some incumbents, but it’s not just a blanket rule,” she said.

Cristina Marcos contributed.

Warren corrects Sanders after he seeks to correct her at debate

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenWarren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases OVERNIGHT DEFENSE: Joint Chiefs chairman says he regrets participating in Trump photo-op | GOP senators back Joint Chiefs chairman who voiced regret over Trump photo-op | Senate panel approves 0B defense policy bill Trump on collision course with Congress over bases with Confederate names MORE (D-Mass.) quickly moved to correct Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Hill’s 12:30 Report: Milley apologizes for church photo-op Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk Biden courts younger voters — who have been a weakness MORE (I-Vt.) at the Democratic primary debate in Iowa on Tuesday after he refuted Warren’s claim that she was the only candidate onstage to have defeated a Republican incumbent over the last 30 years. 

“The men on this stage have lost 10 elections,” Warren said, pointing out that she and Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharHillicon Valley: Biden calls on Facebook to change political speech rules | Dems demand hearings after Georgia election chaos | Microsoft stops selling facial recognition tech to police Democrats demand Republican leaders examine election challenges after Georgia voting chaos Harris grapples with defund the police movement amid veep talk MORE (D-Minn.) were the only candidates onstage who had never lost an election.

“The only person who has beaten an incumbent Republican any time in the last 30 years is me,” Warren added.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Just to set the record straight, I defeated an incumbent Republican running for Congress,” Sanders said later when it was his turn to speak. 

“When?” Warren asked.

“1990,” Sanders responded as Warren appeared to count in her head. “That’s how I won. I beat an incumbent congressman.” 

“Thirty years ago?” Warren said. “I said I was the only one who’s beaten an incumbent Republican in 30 years.” 

“Well, 30 years ago is 1990, as a matter of fact,” Sanders said. “But I don’t know that that is the major issue of the day.”  

Sanders defeated former Vermont Republican Rep. Peter Smith in 1990 to win his House seat. Smith was in his first term. 

ADVERTISEMENT

The exchange comes amid newfound tension between the Sanders and Warren campaigns. 

CNN reported — and Warren confirmed — on Monday that Sanders told her in a private meeting in 2018 that he did not believe a woman could be president. 

Sanders disputed the remarks at Tuesday’s debate. 

“Anyone who knows me knows that it is incomprehensible that I do not think a woman could be president of the United States,” he said. 

Texas shooting security guard warns of attacks on Second Amendment, criticizes Bloomberg

The man who is credited with stopping a shooter during an attack at a church in Texas by opening fire and killing the gunman has sharply criticized a gun control policy touted by former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg.

Jack Wilson told The Dallas Morning News in an interview that he thinks a gun control plan pushed by Bloomberg, a 2020 presidential hopeful running in the Democratic primary, would have left him helpless to respond to the shooter.

“If we were operating under Bloomberg’s position, we wouldn’t have had any guns in there,” Wilson told the newspaper. “The outcome would have been extremely more severe than it was.”

ADVERTISEMENT

A spokeswoman for Bloomberg’s campaign responded to the claim, telling the newspaper that under Bloomberg’s proposal, the shooter’s criminal history would have prevented him from obtaining a firearm.

“Mr. Wilson certainly acted bravely, but the killer had a history of violence and mental health issues and under Mike’s plan, he would never [have] had a gun,” the spokeswoman said.

Bloomberg, who has made gun control a central issue of his 2020 campaign, previously addressed the Texas shooting during an address in Montgomery, Ala.

“It may be true that someone in the congregation had his own gun and killed the person who murdered two other people, but it’s the job of law enforcement to have guns and to decide when to shoot,” the former mayor said at the time, adding, “You just do not want the average citizen carrying a gun in a crowded place.”

Click Here: cheap all stars rugby jersey

Bloomberg’s remarks earned him criticism from President TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate advances public lands bill in late-night vote Warren, Democrats urge Trump to back down from veto threat over changing Confederate-named bases Esper orders ‘After Action Review’ of National Guard’s role in protests MORE, who tweeted days afterward: “Now Mini Mike Bloomberg is critical of Jack Wilson, who saved perhaps hundreds of people in a Church because he was carrying a gun, and knew how to use it. Jack quickly killed the shooter, who was beginning a rampage. Mini is against the 2nd A. His ads are Fake, just like him!”

United States title match set for WWE Payback

After retaining against MVP on last night’s SummerSlam pre-show, Apollo Crews is set to defend his United States Championship against another member of The Hurt Business.

WWE has announced that Bobby Lashley will challenge Crews for the United States title at Payback this coming Sunday:

Apollo Crews may have prevailed over MVP, but that doesn’t mean he’s seen the last of The Hurt Business.

Crews will have to go through The Hurt Business’ All Mighty when [he] defends his United States Championship against Bobby Lashley at WWE Payback.

Warring with MVP for months, Crews has become the primary target of his loquacious rival’s newly formed battalion. The fast-rising champion turned aside MVP’s best at SummerSlam, but Lashley represents an entirely different challenge with his unparalleled strength.

And few know of Lashley’s brute power better than Crews, who was out of action for weeks after being injured by The All Mighty’s Full Nelson.

Can Crews keep his first-ever title reign rolling, or will Lashley bring the gold home to The Hurt Business?

Don’t miss WWE Payback on the award-winning WWE Network, streaming on Sunday, Aug. 30, at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT. 

To build to the match, Mark Henry will officiate an arm wrestling competition between Crews and Lashley on Raw tonight.

The Hurt Business’ Lashley and Shelton Benjamin were banned from ringside for Crews vs. MVP at SummerSlam. That was a stipulation of Crews defeating Benjamin on Raw last week.

Click Here: camisetas de futbol baratas

Crews has been United States Champion since winning the title from Andrade on the May 25 episode of Raw.

Payback is taking place just one week after SummerSlam. Sasha Banks & Bayley defending their Women’s Tag Team titles has also been announced for the PPV, but their challengers have yet to be revealed.